Viewing all content with location: Nicaragua

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Centro Textil (Centex)

Published: June 5, 2014

The WRC found compelling evidence that Centex violated Nicaraguan law, international labor standards, and university codes of conduct by engaging in the following acts: (1) terminating 15 workers in retaliation for forming a union, (2) threatening the remaining workers to dissuade them from exercising their associational rights, and (3) attempting to induce workers, including via offers of financial inducements, to forgo their right to reinstatement.

EINS

Published: March 20, 2013

On February 21, 2013, workers wrote to SAE-A, buyers and the WRC alleging a series of violations, including the termination of 16 workers (nine at EINS and seven at Tecnotex) in retaliation for workers’ lawful exercise of their associational rights.

Tecnotex

Published: March 20, 2013

On February 21, 2013, workers wrote to SAE-A, buyers and the WRC alleging a series of violations, including the termination of 16 workers (nine at EINS and seven at Tecnotex) in retaliation for workers’ lawful exercise of their associational rights.

Flying Needle

Published: November 26, 2012

Shortly after workers of the Flying Needle factory formed a union in May 2012, all twelve union leaders were illegally fired.

New Holland

Published: June 1, 2008

At the time the WRC received the New Holland complaint, workers had recently organized a labor union to try address what they viewed as labor rights violations: the workers alleged verbal harassment of workers, forced overtime, and unclean restroom facilities, among other problems. The primary subject of the complaint was that the company had allegedly tried to eliminate the worker organization from the factory by illegally firing its founding leaders.

Calypso

Published: December 19, 2006

During July and September of 2006, the WRC received three separate complaints from worker representatives concerning three factories in Central America owned by a single multinational apparel corporation, known as the Argus Group. In each case it was alleged that workers who had associated with a trade union had been fired illegally. Other areas of concern included occupational health and safety and overtime.

Atlantic

Published: December 19, 2006

During July and September of 2006, the WRC received three separate complaints from worker representatives concerning three factories in Central America owned by a single multinational apparel corporation, known as the Argus Group. In each case it was alleged that workers who had associated with a trade union had been fired illegally. Other areas of concern included occupational health and safety and overtime.